I have been searching for official information which can help us make informed decisions on any travel. Self isolation / quarantine may apply for people travelling from the UK, Bailiwick of Guernsey or Jersey to France and visa versa, so please do check the regulations first.

This is the site for the completion of the information prior to visiting – ports-manche.com/reservations-…

Covid19 report – July 2020

Below is a very informative and helpful report that Marcus Ferbrache from Jersey posted when he visited Carteret in Normany from Jersey. This was posted on my Brittany and Normandy Facebook group – www.facebook.com/groups/239744…

For anyone considering their first trip of the year to France but worrying about what a visit would be like under COVID you may be interested in our first-hand experience last weekend. We set out from St Helier to Carteret at lunchtime on Friday. Before leaving Jersey we had filled out the online form at www.gov.je/jerseytravel to book a COVID test on our return. NOTE YOU HAVE TO FILL OUT THE FORM MULTIPLE TIMES, ONCE FOR EACH PERSON ABOARD. We also filled in the online form to reserve a berth at ports-manche.com/reservations-… though we didn’t get a confirmation and so I rang Carteret marina before setting sail just to make sure everything was ok.

Our arrival went smoothly and we were met by the marina dory and directed to an empty finger berth, the lady in the dory taking our lines.

We headed into town, not knowing quite what to expect and feeling a bit like escaped convicts! We had dinner at la Kalakiki in the evening. You don’t need to wear a mask when walking around the town but you put one on just before entering a restaurant, and keep it on only for the moments until you take your seat at the table. Then you can enjoy your meal as normal. If you get up to go to the toilet, pay the bill or leave then you need to put it back on. This is strictly enforced and the waiters and waitresses make sure everyone follows the procedure.

After our meal, we dropped into the Yacht Club de Barneville Carteret where we were made welcome and had a few drinks, which could be paid for in cash. There were very few other customers.

We went to the marina office to pay for our berth on Saturday morning. Masks must be worn in the office, and only one person is allowed in at a time. The marina staff are behind a perspex screen. We were given a form to fill out and sign to declare that we were in good health. We were told to keep this with us at all times in case we were stopped by a customs and immigration official. Apparently you can keep this form between visits.

We had pre-booked to hire electric bikes which are collected at the marina office. The online form at ports-manche.com/booking/cycle… is available in French and English. The cost is 25 € a day, or 45 € for two days. We’d brought cycle helmets with us. The bikes have built-in padlocks and are supplied with a canister of puncture repair stuff. Collecting the bikes, including instruction on how they worked, took about 10 minutes. We headed off to Barneville following the maps provided, though we could have just followed the signs. After checking out the Saturday market (the only time we wore masks outdoors, as it as crowded) we headed on to Port-Bail following the fairly well-marked cycle route that follows the seafront for part of the way and then through winding country lanes. It was good to discover that there are cycle lanes along the main roads.

The cycle route took us past Portbail marina and we stopped for a very pleasant lunch at Le Repère, sat on deck chairs on the dune overlooking the estuary. It was the same routine here – mask on when going inside to the bar or to use the loo.

We cycled back to Carteret, the electric bikes’ ‘turbo’ mode making light work of the one hill, and headed to the beach. On the way, my phone rang and it was the COVID helpline in Jersey to tell us that our PCR test was booked for 2 pm on Sunday.

It amazes us that there’s no proper supermarket in Carteret itself, so we rode to the big Carrefour in Barneville, the 2km ride taking under ten minutes, to do some shopping. Everyone in the supermarket was wearing masks. It is down a hill, so the electric motors proved their worth again on the way back up.

We returned the bikes (they have to be back by 1900) and then it was off to dinner at L’Abri where we had a very warm welcome and great service. It was busy and they were turning customers away so bookings are essential. We had excellent oysters and galette completes, ending up too full for dessert. €34 a head including wine seemed very good value.

We logged a transit report with Jersey Coastguard before leaving Carteret and they asked us to confirm that we’d submitted the online form to arrange a test on arrival. If we hadn’t they wouldn’t have let us leave France.

After arriving back in St Helier mid-morning we had time to head home, have showers and lunch before heading up to the COVID drive-through testing station just along the road from Jersey Airport at the pre-arranged time. We were a bit anxious what the test would be like, but it was fine. We drove in, confirmed our names and dates of birth, and then had a swab poked at the back of our throat while we said ‘ahhh’, then the same swab rubbed around the inside of one nostril. The whole process took under 5 minutes and we were free to go. You’ll later receive a text message, which you have to reply to saying ‘WELL’ if you haven’t developed any symptoms, or COVID if you or anyone in your party has done.

I’m currently working from home awaiting the test results which are currently taking on average 31 hours from time of arrival.

In summary, we had a great trip and a warm welcome. We quickly got used to wearing masks and it wasn’t a big deal – everyone else was doing the same. The test was quick to arrange and quick to have done on our return.

Thank you Marcus

Please note, wearing a mask is mandatory in public transport in France.

Visits to Guernsey

Guernsey begs French boaters not to dock

The Channel Island is within sailing distance of the west coast of the Cotentin. The excursion is tempting. However, the authorities of the Bailiwick of Guernsey recall that the islands remain closed to foreign visitors until further notice.

Guernesey supplie les plaisanciers français de ne pas accoster

L’île anglo-normande est à portée de voile de la côte ouest du Cotentin. L’excursion est tentante. Les autorités du Baillage de Guernesey rappellent toutefois que les îles demeurent interdites aux visiteurs étrangers jusqu’à nouvel ordre. – see france3-regions.francetvinfo.f…

Official sites

Two official websites for Covid hotspots are : www.bretagne.ars.sante.fr and www.normandie.ars.sante.fr 

French government site – in English – www.gouvernement.fr/en/coronav…
www.gouvernement.fr/info-coron…

Government map – www.gouvernement.fr/info-coron…

Cherbourg peninsular – www.manche.gouv.fr/Politiques-…

Brittany – Côtes-d’Armor – www.cotes-darmor.gouv.fr/Polit…

Brittany – Finistère (west of Trebeurden) – www.finistere.gouv.fr/Actualit…

Brittany – Morbihan – www.morbihan.gouv.fr/Actualite…

Guernsey – covid19.gov.gg/

Jersey – www.gov.je/Health/Coronavirus/…
also
www.gov.je/health/coronavirus/…

Other information

www.itv.com/news/channel/2020-…

Brittany Tourism site – www.brittanytourism.com/